courses / Undergraduate Courses / Selected Topics in Film

Rhetoric 1A/1B
Undergraduate Courses
010 Intro to Practical Reasoning F13
010 Intro to Practical Reasoning
010 Modern Reason Session A
010 Modern Reason
020  Rhetorical Interpretation
020 Rhetoric of Interpretation Session D
020 Rhetoric of Interpretation
020 Rhetorical Interpretation (Sp 13)
024 Ansel Adams's Fiat Lux and the Visual Rhetoric of Berkeley in the 1960s
024 Arguing with Judge Judy
024 Bad Books and How to Spot Them
024 Decoding the Mysteries of Literature
10 Intro to Practical Reasoning Session A
10 Introduction to Practical Reasoning
103A Approaches and Paradigms in the History of Rhetorical Theory
103A Approaches and Paradigms
103A Are We Not Men?  Classical Rhetoric for Real

 

103A History of Rhet Theory I
103A History of Rhetorical Theory I
103A History of Rhetorical Theory I
103A Introduction to Rhetorical Theory Session A
103B  Rhetoric 103B
103B Approaches and Paradigms in the History of Rhetorical Theory II

 

103B History of Rhetorical Theory II Session D
103B History of Rhetorical Theory II
103B History of Rhetorical Theory II
103B History of Rhetorical Theory II
103B History of Rhetorical Theory Session D
103B Rhetorical Theory II
104 Before and After the Digital
104 The Unconscious in Modern Culture
105T Religious and Moral Alternatives in Greco-Roman Antiquity
105T Rhetoric of Religious Discourse
106 Rhetoric of Historical Discourse
106 Rhetoric of Historical Discourse
106 Rhetoric of Historical Discourse
107 Rhetoric of Scientific Discourse
108 Rhetoric of Philosophical Discourse
109  Aesthetics and Rhetoric
109 Aesthetics and Rhetoric
110  Adv. Argumentative Writing
110 Advanced Argumentation
110 Legal Discourse
112 Rhetoric of Narrative Genres in Non-Literate Societies (Sp 13)
114 
Rhetoric of New Media
114  New Media
114 Rhetoric of Digital Media
114 Rhetoric of New Media
116 Rhetoric, Culture and Society
117   Between Philosophy and Tragedy
117  Between Philosophy and Tragedy
117  Philosophy and Tragedy
118  Advanced Argumentative Writing
118 Theory & Practice of Reading & Interpretation F13
118 Theory and Practice of Reading and Interpretation
118 Undergraduate Seminar on the Theory and Practice of Reading and Interpretation
119  Rhetorical Places
121  Rhetoric of Fiction
121 Rhetoric of Fiction Session A
121 The Rhetoric of Fiction
121 The Rhetoric of Selfhood in the Graphic Novel Session A
122 Rhetoric of Drama
124 Rhetoric of Poetry
124 Rhetoric of Poetry
124 Rhetoric of Poetry
125 Poetry and Poetics
127  Narrating the Nation
127 Narrating the Nation
127 Novel, Society & Politics
128T Rhetoric and Politics of Interviews
129 Rhetoric of Autobiography F13
129 Rhetoric of Autobiography
129AC Rhetoric of Autobiography
130   Special Topics in Film
130  Special Topics in Film
130  Special Topics in Film
130 Adaptations of Female Gothic Horror
130 Hitchcock Adaptations
130 Jane Austen Adaptations
130 Novel Into Film
130 Novel into Film
130 Special Topics in Film
131T Genre in Film and Literature
131T Screening Sex
131T The Western/Film Noir Hybrid
132T ‘Documentary’ Visions
132T Auteur in Film
132T Auteur Theory
132T The Films of Powell & Pressburger
133T  Color Theory
133T Theories of Film
133T Theories of Film
135T American National Identity in Film
135T Performance in Film
135T Selected Topics in Film
135T Selected Topics in Film
135T Special Topics
136 Art and Authorship
138 Rhetoric of Television Criticism
139  Rhetoric of Visual Witnessing
150 Rhetoric of Contemporary Politics
150 Rhetoric of Contemporary Politics
151 Rhetoric of Contact and Conquest
152AC Before the Civil War
152AC Imperial Visions
152AC Race & Order in the New Republic F13
152AC Race & Order in the New Republic
152AC Race and Order in the New Republic
152AC Race and Order in the New Republic
153 American Political Rhetoric
156 Dangerous Fictions
156 Political Fiction in the 18th Century
157A Modern Political Theory
157A Rhetoric of Modern Political Theory
157B Rhetoric of Contemporary Political Theory
159A Great Theorists in Political and Legal Theory
159A Great Theorists in the Rhetoric of Political and Legal Theory
159B Great Themes in the Rhetoric of Contemporary Political and Legal Theory
160 Intro to Rhetoric of Legal Discourse Session D
160 Intro to the Rhetoric of Legal Discourse Session D
160 Intro to the Rhetoric of Legal Discourse
160 Intro to the Rhetoric of Legal Discourse
160 Legal Discourse
164 Rhetoric of Legal Theory
165 Rhetoric of Legal Philosophy F13
165 Rhetoric of Legal Philosophy
166 International Humanitarian Law and the Politics of Protection
166 Practices of Rhetoric, Law and Politics
167 

  Advanced Themes in Legal Theory, Philosophy, Argumentation

167 Advanced Themes in Legal Theory, Philosophy, Argumentation
167 Destiny of Freedom
168 Advanced Themes in Contemporary Law & Legal Discourse
170 Rhetoric of Social Science
171 The Problem of Mass Culture & the Rhetoric of Social Theory
171 The Problem of Mass Culture and the Rhetoric of Social Theory
172 Rhetoric of Social Theory
176  The Matter of Archives
176 The Matter of Archives
182  Rhetoric of Sexual Exchange
182  Sexual Exchange
182 Rhetorics of Sexual Exchange and Sexual Difference
189  Special Topics
189 Theory of the Copy
20 

Introduction to the study of rhetorical interpretation, treating how the action of tropes, figur

20 Rhetorical Interpretation
20 The Rhetoric of Interpretation
200 Rhetoric 200

Instructor Boyarin

Graduate Courses

Undergraduate Courses

Rhetoric 135T: Selected Topics in Film



Scheduled
Spring 2012  Instructor(s)  Eileen Jones

Typical approaches to a course topic such as this one would include a cultural studies approach, examining American films as ideological texts with representational systems for depicting, among other things, race, class, gender and sexuality, representational systems that can be decoded by the analytical spectator. Or a historical approach, studying American films as sociological and cultural artifacts that both reflect and shape public attitudes toward key events and eras in American history. While not rejecting either of these approaches—we will draw on both—in this course, we will emphasize the development of certain film genres in response to aspects of American life, in the philosophical terms set out by Stanley Cavell:  

“...[T]he members of a genre share the inheritence of certain conditions, procedures and subjects and goals of composition, and...each member of such a genre represents a study of these conditions...”

For Cavell, the inheritence of a genre includes a complex weave of historical and aesthetic antecedents which gives rise to the necessity of “study,” of collective popular cogitation on a perplexity, in the form of a genre. We will look at examples from some uniquely American genres, including the Western, the gangster film, the screwball comedy, film noir, and the zombie film, in this light. We will also consider the films of certain directors, often working within genres, who were or are clearly invested in representing, examining, and/or mythologizing certain relationships between American geography and “the American character,” between physical environment and social configuration, such as John Ford, Frank Capra, Preston Sturges, Stanley Kubrick, George Romero, and the Coen Brothers.